Sharita Halon

'Seriously, don't even get me started on my hot bod. You don't want to see me naked, Dave. Seeing me naked actually took Hazel Grace's breath away,' he said, nodding toward the oxygen tank.

Overview


Retrocalcaneal Bursitis is an inflammation of the protective sack between the heel bone and the Achilles tendon. It is the inflamed bursa that produces the redness and swelling associated with Haglund's deformity.


Causes


Improper foot wear, tight shoes or shoes that do not fit properly can cause extra pressure and friction on the back of the heel. Overtime, this pressure causes irritation of the bursae that protects the Achilles tendon causing one or both to swell and become inflamed. Athletes who overtrain or runners that increase their distance to quickly are at greater risk of experiencing Achilles bursitis. With over use, the Achilles bursae and tendon can become irritated and inflamed leading to thickening of the bursae lining and wearing of the tendon. Fluid builds in the bursa when it becomes irritated causing swelling of the Achilles bursa and pain at the back of the heel.


Symptoms


Achiness or stiffness in the affected joint. Worse pain when you press on or move the joint. A joint that looks red and swollen (especially when the bursae in the knee or elbow are affected). A joint that feels warm to the touch, compared to the unaffected joint, which could be a sign that you have an infection in the bursa. A ?squishy? feeling when you touch the affected part. Symptoms that rapidly reappear after an injury or sharp blow to the affected area.


Diagnosis


Carrying out a diagnosis for bursitis is fairly straightforward. The doctor will examine the affected area and ask the patient some questions about his/her recent activities. If the patient has a high temperature the physician may take a small sample of fluid from a bursa near the affected body part. The sample will be tested for bacteria, and perhaps also crystals. If the patient does not get better after treatment the doctor may carry out further tests so that he/she can eliminate the possibility that the symptoms might not be due to something else. These may include an x-ray, to make sure no bones are broken or fractured. Blood tests, to check for rheumatoid arthritis. A CT scan or MRI scan to see if there is a torn tendon.


Non Surgical Treatment


Specific treatment for bursitis will be determined by your doctor based on your age, overall health, and medical history. Extent of the condition. Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies. Expectations for the course of the condition. Your opinion or preference. The treatment of any bursitis depends on whether or not it involves infection. Aseptic bursitis. A noninfectious condition caused by inflammation resulting from local soft-tissue trauma or strain injury. Treatment may include R.I.C.E. Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Anti-inflammatory and pain medications, such as ibuprofen or aspirin. Aspiration of the bursa fluid for evaluation in the laboratory. Injection of cortisone into the affected area. Rest. Splints.


Surgical Treatment


Surgery is rarely done strictly for treatment of a bursitis. If any underlying cause is the reason, this may be addressed surgically. During surgery for other conditions, a bursa may be seen and removed surgically.